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The Office of Insurance Regulation has received the 2018 Florida workers’ compensation rate filing by the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI), which proposes a statewide average premium decrease of 9.6%. This includes a statewide average rate decrease of 9.3% and a reduction of the fixed expense cost applicable to every workers’ compensation policy in Florida from $200 to $160. The new rates would become effective January 1, 2018.

As always, the Office will review the filing to ensure the proposed changes are not excessive, inadequate, or unfairly discriminatory and evaluate its potential effects on the insurance marketplace and employers, who are required by law to carry this insurance on their employees. A public rate hearing will be conducted in October.

NCCI is a licensed rating organization authorized to make rate filings on behalf of workers’ compensation insurance companies in Florida. For more information about the filing, read the NCCI press statement.

After 3 years of workers compensation rate increases, Florida based companies may see a small decrease come 2015. The National Council on Compensation Insurance Inc. announced in a statement on Friday, August 22 that they are recommending an overall rate decrease for workers compensation in Florida. This has not happened statewide since 2010.

NCCI is the licensed rating and statistical organization that fosters a healthy workers compensation system for Florida. They suggested an average rate decrease of 2.5% with an effective date of January 1, 2015. The decrease is still pending approval from the Office of Insurance Regulation, who makes the final decision. Read more

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Heat-safety-OSHAHeat illness can be deadly. Every year, thousands of workers become sick from exposure to heat, and some even die. These illnesses and deaths are preventable. OSHA’s nationwide Heat Illness Prevention Campaign aims to raise awareness and teach workers and employers about the dangers of working in hot weather and provide valuable resources to address these concerns. Begun in 2011, the Heat Illness Prevention Campaign has reached more than 7 million people and distributed close to half a million fact sheets, posters, quick cards, training guides and wallet cards.

OSHA has available numerous resources that can be used to prevent heat illnesses:

  • The Educational Resources section links to information about heat illnesses and how to prevent them.
  • The Using the Heat Index section provides guidance to employers to develop a heat illness prevention campaign.
  • The Training section includes a guide/lesson plan for employers and others to use in instructing workers on heat illness. There are links to additional resources in other languages.
  • The Fatality map shows locations of outdoor worker, heat-related fatalities between 2008 and 2012. It is not an exhaustive list of all worker fatalities from heat exposure.

Click here to download OSHA’s Heat Safety Resources.

 

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The economic impact is pretty easy to project. If an insurance company is forced by law to pay over 150% more on high value claims, where do you think they are going to recoup that money? The answer is premium and rate increases, of course. This is exactly what can be expected in light of the February 28, 2013 First District Court of Appeal (DCA) decision regarding a case called Westphal v. St. Petersburg.
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Real change in safety performance will come about with a change in the safety culture of an organization. Think about the change in the use of seat belts from 30 years ago to now. What got people to put them on without even thinking about them? Gory accidents? Probably not. It was leadership backing up a change in behavior, and then repetitive education, enforcement, and encouragement. Change in culture requires consistent leadership and repetition. A systematic change in the values of the target audience is needed, not a new priority that comes and goes with funding priorities. There are certain steps safety managers can take to make safety a greater value to management and front-line employees. Here are nine steps to a successful safety culture: Read more

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