Gulfshore Insurance > Gulfshore Blog > Human Resources

Work Comp Changes for COVID 19Under most state workers’ compensation (WC) laws, COVID-19 may be a compensable, work-related condition only if an employee can show that:

  • He or she contracted the coronavirus while performing services growing out of and incidental to his or her employment; and
  •  The disease arose out of that employment (work relatedness).

As of June 30, 2020, however, several states have made—or are in the process of making—changes that reverse this burden for certain employees. In general, these changes mean that it would be an employer’s burden to prove that an employee did not contract COVID-19 on the job, rather than the employee’s burden of proving that he or she did contract it on the job. While most of these changes apply only to certain types of workers—such as first responders, health care providers or those who are otherwise deemed “essential” some changes apply the new presumption more broadly.

Many states have also taken actions that aim to reduce the impact of COVID-19-related claims on an employer’s WC premium rates.

The Compliance Bulletin provides general information about the COVID-19-related changes made to state WC laws and policies.

Click here to download the legal update

We will continue to share information as it becomes available and keep you informed.

Ryan Laude is a Client Advisor at Gulfshore Insurance specializing in employee benefits. Ryan works with a wide range of businesses to create the best funding options that fit their needs. Comments and questions are welcome at rlaude@gulfshoreinsurance.com

Post-coronavirus Office Checklist

As organizations create return-to-work plans, many employers are reviewing best practices for their post-coronavirus office. By updating office layouts, encouraging new behaviors and expanding remote work options, employers can help prevent the spread of diseases and protect the health and safety of employees. Use this checklist as a guide when evaluating changes to your office.

Click here to download the checklist

This is a constantly evolving area, with new guidance being issued nearly every day. Gulfshore Insurance will continue to monitor the rapidly developing COVID-19 situation and provide updates as appropriate.

 

Phase 2 InfographicOn June 3, Governor Ron DeSantis issued Executive Order 20-139 announcing Phase 2 of Florida’s reopening plan following COVID-19: Safe. Smart. Step-by-Step.

The plan allows for further reopening of the state beginning Friday, June 5. All counties with the exception of Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties may move into Phase 2.

Phase 2 allows for restaurants to serve at the bar with social distancing. Bars can open at a 50% capacity indoors with recommended social distancing. There will be no limit on capacity for outdoor seating as long as social distancing guidelines are followed. Entertainment business including movie theaters and bowling alleys can also operate at a 50% capacity.

Executive Order 20-139 is available here.

Click here to download the infographic

This a constantly evolving area, with new guidance being issued nearly every day. Gulfshore Insurance will continue to monitor the rapidly developing COVID-19 situation and provide updates as appropriate.

Commercial Lines Guidance for Reopening Offices and Public SpacesTemperature checks, face masks, and hand sanitizer stations are just a few of the changes you’ll see as offices and public spaces begin to open. Besides continuing to follow the recommendations issued by state and local health departments when determining the most appropriate actions to take, we are sharing useful guides to ensure the safety of yourself and others in order to reduce the risk of exposure to COVID-19:

 

This a constantly evolving area, with new guidance being issued nearly every day. Gulfshore Insurance will continue to monitor the rapidly developing COVID-19 situation and provide updates as appropriate.

What to do After Receiving a PPP Loan

The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) is designed to get cash in the hands of suffering small businesses quickly, with less stringent eligibility requirements than the existing U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) loan programs. PPP loans are designed to incentivize business owners to keep employees on payroll. These loans provide 100% federally guaranteed loans to small businesses, through Jun. 30, 2020. Importantly, these loans may be forgiven if borrowers maintain their payrolls during the crisis.

Using Funds Appropriately to Remain Eligible for Forgiveness

U.S. small businesses that were able to secure financial relief through the SBA’s Payroll Protection Program should consider the following to help their cause for qualification of forgiveness of the full principal amount of the loan and any accrued interest:

  • Use the loan funds only toward: payroll, including salary, wages, tips and covered benefits for employees; rent or mortgage interest; and utilities.
  • Ensure at least 75% of loan funds are allocated for payroll costs.
  • Maintain the level of full-time employee (FTE) headcount without reduction during the eight-week covered period.
  • Maintain the salaries and wages of your workforce during the eight-week covered period. Any reduction of more than 25% for any employee who makes less than $100,000 will reduce the amount forgiven.
  • Preserve proper documentation to support the amount of proceeds used for payroll costs, rent or mortgage, and utilities.
  • Prior to June 30, 2020, restore all full-time employment and salary levels back from any reductions made between Feb. 15, 2020, and April 26, 2020.

 

We will continue to share information as it becomes available and keep you informed.

Click here to download the full article provided to Gulfshore Insurance by Zywave.

Joe Thompson is a Client Advisor and Partner at Gulfshore Insurance who specializes in managing risk for community associations and various contractorsComments and questions are welcome at jthompson@gulfshoreinsurance.com