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Promptly reporting workers’ compensation claims is a best practice, and now there’s evidence that a delay in reporting injuries can raise claims costs up to 51%.

Promptly reporting workers’ compensation claims is a best practice, and now there’s evidence that a delay in reporting injuries can raise claims costs. A new study from the National Council on Compensation Insurance, Inc. (NCCI) reports that a delayed injury report can increase compensation claim costs up to 51 percent as the condition worsens. The simple strategy of reporting claims promptly can significantly reduce claims costs.

NCCI researchers found that claims costs can climb after a delay of only seven days. A report more than 29 days after an incident may result in costs nearly 49 percent higher. One reason for the increase is that attorneys are more likely to become involved in comp cases the longer a claim is delayed. Employers are encouraged to help employees understand that prompt reporting of an accidental injury decreases the likelihood of an attorney’s involvement, according to J. Bradley Young, a partner with Harris, Dowell, Fisher & Harris, who works on compensation cases.

“I still deal with employers every day who feel that if they educate their workforce about comp laws, they’re simply telling their employees how to get more money out of comp claims, which isn’t the case,” Young told researchers.

Other obstacles to early reporting in the workplace are the perceptions that the employee who reports an injury will be doubted or considered lazy and not wanting to work. By not coming forward, some injuries can worsen, making costly measures such as surgery more likely. Employers can boost employee morale by communicating that injuries are a serious matter, and that employee well-being is a priority.

Based on the NCCI survey, employers who educate their workforce about early reporting and who demonstrate concern for all workplace injuries can significantly help create positive benefits for their employees while minimizing claims costs.

Contact the Gulfshore Insurance Risk Management Team with questions concerning claims reporting processes, as well as tools available to help mitigat workplace risks.

Tim Spear is a Client Advisor and Partner at Gulfshore Insurance. Tim works with a wide range of business clients to deliver strategic risk management and commercial property and casualty insurance guidance.

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The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) is charged with ensuring that all employers provide a safe workplace for their employees.  Under federal law, all employers, regardless of size or industry type, must report to OSHA all fatal work-related accidents and work-related hospitalizations of 3 or more employees.

Starting January 1, 2015, all employers will be required to report work-related fatalities within 8 hours and all in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye within 24 hours of finding out about the incident.

Employers have 3 options for reporting these incidents to OSHA:

  • Call the regional OSHA office in Atlanta at 678-237-0400
  • Call the 24-hour OSHA hotline at 800-321-OSHA (6742)
  • Report online at osha.gov/report_online

Under Florida law, employers must also report all workplace fatalities to the Florida Division of Workers’ Compensation by calling 800-219-8953.  Alternatively, employers can fax a First Report of Injury form containing the fatality information to 850-413-1980.

In addition to these reporting requirements, employers who have workers’ compensation insurance are also  required to report all workplace injuries to their workers’ compensation insurance company.  By law, employees are required to report work-related injuries to their employer no later than 30 days after they happen.  Employers must then report work-related injuries to their insurance company within 7 days after learning of the injury.  Late reporting of claims to your insurance carrier can result in the state assessing penalties and holding the employer responsible for paying part of the injured employee’s benefits.

Employers should report all claims from employees to the employer’s insurance company, including claims in which there are no witnesses of the injury or illness.  It is the insurance company’s responsibility to then investigate all claims and determine if employees are entitled to workers’ compensation benefits.

Gulfshore Insurance has a team of dedicated and licensed claims adjusters ready to be your advocate in the event of a loss. Reporting a claim can be done several ways. Call the team at 239.261.3646 or 800.793.5238 (toll-free). We also have an after-hours emergency line that can be used 7 days-a-week, call 866.298.8303. Log on to our website at GulfshoreInsurance.com/claims and follow the simple steps to file a claim. We are here for you—before, during, and after a claim.

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) has new reporting requirements for 2015. OSHA is charged with ensuring that all employers provide a safe workplace for their employees. Under federal law, all employers, regardless of size or industry type, must report to OSHA all fatal work-related accidents and work-related hospitalizations of three or more employees.

Starting January 1, 2015, all employers will be required to report work-related fatalities within 8 hours and all in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye within 24 hours of finding out about the incident.

OSHA reporting requirements give employers 3 options for reporting such incidents:

  • Call the regional OSHA office in Atlanta at 678-237-0400
  • Call the 24-hour OSHA hotline at 800-321-OSHA (6742)
  • Report online at osha.gov/report_online

 

Under Florida law, employers must also report all workplace fatalities to the Florida Division of Workers’ Compensation by calling 800-219-8953. Alternatively, employers can fax a First Report of Injury form containing the fatality information to 850-413-1980.

In addition to these reporting requirements, employers who have workers’ compensation insurance are also required to report all workplace injuries to their workers’ compensation insurance company. By law, employees are required to report work-related injuries to their employer no later than 30 days after they happen. Employers must then report work-related injuries to their insurance company within 7 days after learning of the injury. Late reporting of claims to your insurance carrier can result in the state assessing penalties and holding the employer responsible for paying part of the injured employee’s benefits.

Employers should report all claims from employees to the employer’s insurance company, including claims in which there are no witnesses of the injury or illness. It is the insurance company’s responsibility to then investigate all claims and determine if employees are entitled to workers’ compensation benefits.

Gulfshore Insurance has a team of dedicated and licensed claims adjusters ready to be your advocate in the event of a loss. Reporting a claim can be done several ways. Call a Claims Advocate at 239.261.3646 or 800.793.5238 (toll-free). Connect to our after-hours emergency line seven days-a-week at 866.298.8303 or log on to our website at GulfshoreInsurance.com/claims and follow the simple steps to file a claim. We are here for you—before, during, and after a claim.

Extending a heartfelt ‘thanks’ to all of our valued clients and carrier partners on Thanksgiving! Thank you for the confidence you have placed in us.  Wishing you and your families a joyous holiday season and a safe and prosperous New Year! Watch the short video from Gulfshore Insurance.