Gulfshore Insurance > Gulfshore Blog > Religious & Non-Profits

The last five churches in a row I’ve talked to have been missing some of the easiest insurance credits available. Workers Compensation (WC) usually isn’t a big expense for churches, but if you can save money by applying automatic state-approved credits, you should take it. While the state of Florida dictates the rates all WC insurance companies must charge, it also allows for two line-item credits. When you qualify, which is very easy to do, the insurance carriers are required to apply the credits.

These credits are (1) a 2% Safety Credit for maintaining a safety program and (2) a 5% Drug Free Workplace Credit (DFW). To qualify for these credits, the church simply needs to maintain a written program that applies to each topic.

When it comes to a written safety program, the document doesn’t have to be elaborate. As long as it contains procedures for safe work activities and documenting accidents, the 2% credit is easy. Written safety plans that qualify for the safety credit should be customized for your organization by your insurance agent in order to take the burden off administrative staff from creating a safety program from scratch. To have the credit applied, your insurance carrier will ask you to sign a one-page credit application, and the 2% credit will be endorsed to your policy.

The drug free credit isn’t much different in terms of its requirement or application. To qualify, the church must maintain a written document that outlines when drug testing will be performed. To qualify for the credit, the only testing that is required is pre-employment and post-accident. Random testing is not required. Again, the written DFW procedures should be supplied by your insurance agency and customized for your operations. To have the credit applied, your carrier will require another one-page credit application. Based on the hiring rates and accident rates of churches, the 5% credit usually far outweighs the cost of running the required tests.

Click here to request written Safety and DFW programs, customized for your church.

Both the safety and DFW credits can be applied to your policy at any point during the year. You do not have to wait until your policy renews to apply the credits. Whenever the credit applications are received by the insurance carrier, they will endorse the policy and prorate the credits. This 7% total credit is entirely in your control.

*The bonus credit comes in the form of discretionary dividends from the insurance carrier. This is how insurance companies compete against each other in Florida. Some carriers require you have no claims for the year before they will credit you back a percentage of your premium. Depending on how much premium you pay, the dividend credit can vary; the more premium, the higher the potential dividend. However, some carriers will apply a flat percentage credit (usually 5% or 10%) regardless of your claims. The carriers that offer these bonus dividend credits love working with churches and non-profit organizations, so make sure you see quotes from only those that specialize in the industry.

To view our complete risk management library of articles for churches and non-profits, click here.

John Keller, CRM ARM CIC AAI is Client Advisor & Risk Manager at Gulfshore Insurance specializing in non-profit and religious organizations. John works with a wide range of business clients to deliver strategic risk analysis and guidance. Comments and questions are welcome at jkeller@gulfshoreinsurance.com

If your church is in the unfortunate situation of leaving its long-term affiliation with The United Methodist Church, the process may seem daunting. The success and efficiency of the process will depend on engaging the right professionals, experienced in working with churches and non-profit organizations.

Insurance, both property and casualty as well as health benefits, will be a critical component of the denominational departure process.  Because The Florida Conference of The United Methodist Church has historically self-insured all insurance risk, any break from the conference will require new insurance coverage and the selection of the local congregation’s own professional insurance advisor.  This advisor or agent should be able to provide you with the coverage all churches require, including: property insurance including hurricanes, general liability, automobile, umbrella, workers compensation, flood, directors & officers, employment practices, crime, cyber, pastoral professional, and sexual abuse coverage.  The insurance agency you choose to work with should be able to provide claims professionals, risk management resources (written safety programs, employee handbooks, liability waivers, and other formal documents), and access to the top five (5) insurance carriers that compete for church insurance coverage.

As you plan for the departure and move into the local congregation’s own insurance program, it will be important to collect the following items to make the transition as efficient as possible and to get the best terms and premium:

  • Current insurance summary available from www.flumc.org/insurancesummary2019
  • Name and FEIN of all entities
  • Addresses and number of buildings for all locations, including parsonages
  • Construction information on buildings (building type, sq ft, roof type, year of updates/improvements)
  • Building replacement cost valuation (agents and carriers can estimate this, but recent appraisals are preferred)
  • Personal property valuation
  • # of full/part time staff and pastors
  • # volunteers and board or council members
  • Child Protection Policy
  • Year, make, model for all vehicles
  • Name, DOB and license # for all drivers
  • Current financial statement
  • Current “Loss Run” report outlining claims on all policies (associated with your congregation) for the last four (4) years

 

Gulfshore Insurance is uniquely prepared to provide all the insurance necessary for congregations departing from The United Methodist Church. As one of the largest agencies on Florida’s west coast, with offices in Naples, Ft. Myers, and Sarasota, Gulfshore Insurance specializes in churches and has access to all specialty insurance carriers. This means the process is efficient, thorough and provides the lowest premiums available. Appointments or conference calls can be scheduled with Gulfshore Insurance’s Church and Non-Profit Practice Leader, John Keller, by contacting him at jkeller@gulfshoreinsurance.com or 239-430-7541.

To view our complete risk management library of articles for churches and non-profits, click here.

John Keller, CRM ARM CIC AAI is Client Advisor & Risk Manager at Gulfshore Insurance specializing in non-profit and religious organizations. John works with a wide range of business clients to deliver strategic risk analysis and guidance. Comments and questions are welcome at jkeller@gulfshoreinsurance.com

You can download a sample Emergency Action Plan here

To view our complete risk management library of articles for churches and non-profits, click here.

John Keller, CRM ARM CIC AAI is Client Advisor & Risk Manager at Gulfshore Insurance specializing in non-profit and religious organizations. John works with a wide range of business clients to deliver strategic risk analysis and guidance. Comments and questions are welcome at jkeller@gulfshoreinsurance.com

Shootings, like those in Texas or California or Pennsylvania or Tennessee or Texas again or machete wielding attackers can’t be ignored.

So, what are the best steps for church leaders to protect members and guests from armed attackers?

 

Here are 4 fast steps to consider:

1.) Outsourced Private Security

Private security firms provide on-site services based on your schedule. These firms will provide armed and unarmed security and should be considered for regular services and special events. Just the presence of uniformed security acts as both reassurance and warning. Southwest Florida has some great security firms like Summit Security and Global Security Group International that are experienced in working with churches.

Outside of the obvious cost of outsourcing security, keep in mind that opting for armed third-party security may increase your liability insurance rates or preclude you from coverage from certain insurance carriers.

2.) Volunteer Security

Many churches have members with law enforcement, security, or military training, and they would gladly use those talents for the benefit of the church. While volunteers provide the backbone for all churches, it is critical that any security volunteers be properly screened and trained before making them part of the security team. Screening should include a criminal background check and training should include techniques in the use of appropriate force. Local law enforcement and security firms can be a resource for appropriate training.

A volunteer application and volunteer release forms should be used, and templates can be downloaded by following the links.

 

Quick note on Concealed Carry Firearms: The state of Florida does allow those with a concealed carry license to bring their guns to church. However, there is a HUGE caveat which I wrote about in another article “Can I Take My Gun to Church?” That caveat is whether your church also has a school (including preschool) on site. As any Conceal Carry Weapons Holder (CCWH) knows, it is a second-degree misdemeanor in Florida to carry a weapon on school grounds, even if the school is not in session and even if the school is in another building. This means that if your church has a school on site, then bringing licensed firearm to church is a no-go. If you have CCWH staff or members they may be a great backup plan but shouldn’t be relied on as a primary response, especially if there is a school on-site.

3.) Develop a Plan

A formal Emergency Action Plan can encompass not only weather and medical-related emergencies but should also include a plan of action for intruders and unruly guests. A plan does nothing on its own, so once developed, the plan should be reviewed, and employees or volunteers trained annually.

Your Emergency Action Plan should include guidelines regarding: dealing with unruly people, evacuation plans, seeking refuge, observation and detention, and lockdowns. You can download a sample Emergency Action Plan here.

4.) Control the Entrances

While there may be multiple potential entrances throughout the church facility in the form of front, rear, and side doors, the risk conscious church leaders will control the entrances. Fire code requires that attendees can exit the building through all doors, but that doesn’t mean they have to be open for entrance at any time. The best scenario is to have only one or two doors open for entrance and all doors open for exit. This allows for the security team to be concentrated at minimal entry points and used most efficiently.

To view our complete risk management library of articles for churches and non-profits, click here.

John Keller, CRM ARM CIC AAI is Client Advisor & Risk Manager at Gulfshore Insurance specializing in non-profit and religious organizations. John works with a wide range of business clients to deliver strategic risk analysis and guidance. Comments and questions are welcome at jkeller@gulfshoreinsurance.com

Yes, except…

There’s always a catch, isn’t there?

And in the case of a licensed Concealed Carry Weapon Holder (CCWH) bringing their firearm to church, there is a big catch…schools.

A CCWH in Florida is not restricted from bringing a firearm to church, but based on FL Statute 790.06, is restricted from carrying at “any school, college, or professional athletic event, not related to firearms, or any elementary or secondary school facility or administration building.” Doing so would be a second-degree misdemeanor carrying a potential $500 fine and up to 60 days in jail.

Schools would include any preschool, elementary school, middle school, junior high school, secondary school, career center, or postsecondary school, whether public or nonpublic. In the case of a church that also happens to have a preschool, elementary, middle or high school on site, then church is a no-go for the CCWH firearm.

Florida legislature has tried to amend this catch for the last few years, but the measure (SB 1238) was again defeated in 2019.

So, what are conscientious church leaders to do? The first step is to create a plan and determine whether armed security is necessary. Here is a link to another article entitled “4 Fast Steps to Protect Your Church Against Attackers” that contains an Emergency Action Plan template that churches can download and create customized plans for severe weather, medical emergencies, and unruly guests or armed intruders.

Any plan should include a security team with a combination of staff, volunteers, and outsourced security. If staff and volunteers are used, there needs to be consideration for the extent of their responsibilities, because organizing an in-house security force encroaches on Florida’s intent to regulate and license private security firms. US Law Shield put out a concise video regarding the potential issues that arise when organizing a security team in Florida churches, and it’s worth the five-minute watch.

 

To view our complete risk management library of articles for churches and non-profits, click here.

John Keller, CRM ARM CIC AAI is Client Advisor & Risk Manager at Gulfshore Insurance specializing in non-profit and religious organizations. John works with a wide range of business clients to deliver strategic risk analysis and guidance. Comments and questions are welcome at jkeller@gulfshoreinsurance.com