Gulfshore Insurance > Gulfshore Blog > Workers' Compensation

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) is charged with ensuring that all employers provide a safe workplace for their employees.  Under federal law, all employers, regardless of size or industry type, must report to OSHA all fatal work-related accidents and work-related hospitalizations of 3 or more employees.

Starting January 1, 2015, all employers will be required to report work-related fatalities within 8 hours and all in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye within 24 hours of finding out about the incident.

Employers have 3 options for reporting these incidents to OSHA:

  • Call the regional OSHA office in Atlanta at 678-237-0400
  • Call the 24-hour OSHA hotline at 800-321-OSHA (6742)
  • Report online at osha.gov/report_online

Under Florida law, employers must also report all workplace fatalities to the Florida Division of Workers’ Compensation by calling 800-219-8953.  Alternatively, employers can fax a First Report of Injury form containing the fatality information to 850-413-1980.

In addition to these reporting requirements, employers who have workers’ compensation insurance are also  required to report all workplace injuries to their workers’ compensation insurance company.  By law, employees are required to report work-related injuries to their employer no later than 30 days after they happen.  Employers must then report work-related injuries to their insurance company within 7 days after learning of the injury.  Late reporting of claims to your insurance carrier can result in the state assessing penalties and holding the employer responsible for paying part of the injured employee’s benefits.

Employers should report all claims from employees to the employer’s insurance company, including claims in which there are no witnesses of the injury or illness.  It is the insurance company’s responsibility to then investigate all claims and determine if employees are entitled to workers’ compensation benefits.

Gulfshore Insurance has a team of dedicated and licensed claims adjusters ready to be your advocate in the event of a loss. Reporting a claim can be done several ways. Call the team at 239.261.3646 or 800.793.5238 (toll-free). We also have an after-hours emergency line that can be used 7 days-a-week, call 866.298.8303. Log on to our website at GulfshoreInsurance.com/claims and follow the simple steps to file a claim. We are here for you—before, during, and after a claim.

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) has new reporting requirements for 2015. OSHA is charged with ensuring that all employers provide a safe workplace for their employees. Under federal law, all employers, regardless of size or industry type, must report to OSHA all fatal work-related accidents and work-related hospitalizations of three or more employees.

Starting January 1, 2015, all employers will be required to report work-related fatalities within 8 hours and all in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye within 24 hours of finding out about the incident.

OSHA reporting requirements give employers 3 options for reporting such incidents:

  • Call the regional OSHA office in Atlanta at 678-237-0400
  • Call the 24-hour OSHA hotline at 800-321-OSHA (6742)
  • Report online at osha.gov/report_online

 

Under Florida law, employers must also report all workplace fatalities to the Florida Division of Workers’ Compensation by calling 800-219-8953. Alternatively, employers can fax a First Report of Injury form containing the fatality information to 850-413-1980.

In addition to these reporting requirements, employers who have workers’ compensation insurance are also required to report all workplace injuries to their workers’ compensation insurance company. By law, employees are required to report work-related injuries to their employer no later than 30 days after they happen. Employers must then report work-related injuries to their insurance company within 7 days after learning of the injury. Late reporting of claims to your insurance carrier can result in the state assessing penalties and holding the employer responsible for paying part of the injured employee’s benefits.

Employers should report all claims from employees to the employer’s insurance company, including claims in which there are no witnesses of the injury or illness. It is the insurance company’s responsibility to then investigate all claims and determine if employees are entitled to workers’ compensation benefits.

Gulfshore Insurance has a team of dedicated and licensed claims adjusters ready to be your advocate in the event of a loss. Reporting a claim can be done several ways. Call a Claims Advocate at 239.261.3646 or 800.793.5238 (toll-free). Connect to our after-hours emergency line seven days-a-week at 866.298.8303 or log on to our website at GulfshoreInsurance.com/claims and follow the simple steps to file a claim. We are here for you—before, during, and after a claim.

After 3 years of workers compensation rate increases, Florida based companies may see a small decrease come 2015. The National Council on Compensation Insurance Inc. announced in a statement on Friday, August 22 that they are recommending an overall rate decrease for workers compensation in Florida. This has not happened statewide since 2010.

NCCI is the licensed rating and statistical organization that fosters a healthy workers compensation system for Florida. They suggested an average rate decrease of 2.5% with an effective date of January 1, 2015. The decrease is still pending approval from the Office of Insurance Regulation, who makes the final decision. Read more

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Q&A with Employment Law Expert Damian Taylor

Q:      Can employers require exempt employees to record their work hours?
A:      The Fair Labor Standards Act is the federal law that imposes minimum wage and overtime pay requirements for most employers. Many “white collar” employees who meet minimum duties and salary tests are exempt from the FLSA’s overtime pay requirements, and therefore receive no overtime pay for hours worked in excess of 40 per week. Contrary to what many exempt employees think, there is nothing prohibiting employers from requiring their exempt employees to record and report their daily hours worked. Although some exempt employees consider the practice demeaning, it is viewed by many employers as a “best practice” for minimizing the risk of expensive overtime claims. One of the more frustrating types of overtime claims to defend is the claim by an employee who alleges he/she was misclassified as exempt, whose hours of work were not tracked, and who grossly exaggerates the number of overtime hours worked. The cost of defending and settling these claims is often inflated because of the difficulty proving the hours actually worked by the employee in the absence of time records. Some of these claims may even be avoided where time records are maintained. . Read more

For the benefit of our clients in the construction industry, we have shared a document from the Florida United Businesses Association (FUBA) that summarizes contractors’ responsibilities under the Florida workers’ compensation law.

Topics include:

  • What kinds of businesses are classified as “construction”?
  • What are the workers’ comp requirements for a business in the construction industry
  • What’s an exemption and how does it work?
  • How can I obtain workers’ compensation or an exemption?
  • What if I hire a sub-contractor?
  • How do I make sure the sub I hire has a valid workers’ comp policy or a valid exemption from workers’ comp?
  • Why it is important that I file my company’s Annual Report with the State of Florida every year?
  • What are the requirements for out-of-state construction businesses doing work in Florida?

You can download the full article here.
Or the Spanish version here.

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