Gulfshore Insurance > Gulfshore Blog > Flood Insurance > Why Flood Insurance Is More Important Than You Think

As we see time and time again, no home is completely safe from the risk of flooding. Flood insurance can be the difference between recovering or being financially devastated.  Just one inch of water in a home can cost more than $25,000 in damage—why risk it?

Do You Need Flood Insurance?

  • FACT: Homeowners and renters insurance does not typically cover flood damage.
  • FACT: More than 20% of flood claims come from properties outside high-risk flood zones.
  • FACT: Flood insurance can pay regardless of whether or not there is a Presidential Disaster Declaration.
  • FACT: Most federal disaster assistance comes in the form of low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and you have to pay them back. FEMA offers disaster grants that don’t need to be paid back, but this amount is often much less than what is needed to recover. A claim against your flood insurance policy could, and often does, provide more funds for recovery than those you could qualify for from FEMA or the SBA — and you don’t have to pay it back.


It’s easy to see that having flood insurance provides important recovery help. The most common flood insurance is offered through the federally regulated program known as the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) with options for your home only or home and contents.

  • The maximum available coverage limit for the dwelling is $250,000.
  • The maximum available coverage limit for contents in your home is $100,000


What if you need more than $250,000 worth of coverage for your home or more than $100,000 of coverage for your contents?  Excess Flood insurance is available through private companies.

Federal Flood Insurance – What is Covered vs. What is Not

What Qualifies as a Flood?
Water has to cover at least 2 acres of land that’s normally dry, or has to have damaged two or more properties (one being your home). Also, the water has to come from:

  • Overflowing inland or tidal waters
  • Unusual, rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters from any source
  • Mudflow (that’s mud carried by a flow of water, creating a river of mud)
  • You’re also covered when shorefront land collapses or sinks due to waters above “anticipated cyclical levels.”

*Water and seepage that comes from sewer or drain backups, or a sump pump that overflows is not considered a flood. Wind driven rain is not covered.

Please do not wait for an impending storm to purchase federal flood insurance. There’s usually a 30-day waiting period. Some private policies offer a 15-day waiting period.